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thepenguinclassics:

'When he was small, when he would fall,on sand or carpet he would liequite flat and still until he knewwhat he would do: get up or cry.’

thepenguinclassics:

'When he was small, when he would fall,
on sand or carpet he would lie
quite flat and still until he knew
what he would do: get up or cry.’

Vladimir Nabokov: Life and Lolita - BBC Documentary

Documentary following writer and broadcaster Stephen Smith on the trail of Vladimir Nabokov, the elusive man behind the controversial novel and 1962 film, Lolita. The journey takes him from the shores of Lake Geneva to Nabokov’s childhood haunts in the Russian countryside south of St Petersburg to the streets of New York City and a road trip through the anonymous world of small-town America. Along the way Smith meets fellow Nabokov admirer Martin Amis and puts in a cheeky visit to Playboy’s literary editor who is publishing an extract of Nabokov’s last work.

I do not own any content in this video. It has been posted for educational purposes only.
A Production for BBC 

maeganramirez:

Vladimir & his butterfly

maeganramirez:

Vladimir & his butterfly

noonestopthesaints:

I cant find the original post

"Lolita" for The Collective Magazine Photo’s by Brian Sassmann:

Human life is but a series of footnotes to a vast obscure unfinished masterpiece.
Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov (via man-of-prose)
bearingmypoordiction:

“Night is always a giant but this one was especially terrible.”
 
“Perhaps if the future existed, concretely and individually, as something that could be discerned by a better brain, the past would not be so seductive: its demands would be balanced by those of the future.” 
 
“This is, I believe, it: not the crude anguish of physical death but the incomparable pangs of the mysterious mental maneuver needed to pass from one state of being to another. Easy, you know, does it, son.” 

bearingmypoordiction:

  • “Night is always a giant but this one was especially terrible.”

 

  • “Perhaps if the future existed, concretely and individually, as something that could be discerned by a better brain, the past would not be so seductive: its demands would be balanced by those of the future.” 

 

  • “This is, I believe, it: not the crude anguish of physical death but the incomparable pangs of the mysterious mental maneuver needed to pass from one state of being to another. Easy, you know, does it, son.”